Omniscient Body


Immersive drawing installation, 74' wide x 14' tall, 2018.
Hand-drawn with charcoal pencils and compressed charcoal sticks on white paper.

Installed at the Fosdick-Nelson Gallery at Alfred University, as part of my MFA Thesis Exhibition 'Out of Body/Into Being.'

Marina-Fridman-art

The immersive installation titled Omniscient Body invites the audience to be enveloped in space, to approach the celestial body of Mars at their own scale, to be towered over by one of the rings of Saturn, and to look up at planet Earth and the Moon as though from a great distance.

 From left to right: Earth, the Moon and Mars.

From left to right: Earth, the Moon and Mars.

Marina-Fridman-drawings
 
 Drawing of Mars, 7'6" x 7'6", charcoal on white paper.

Drawing of Mars, 7'6" x 7'6", charcoal on white paper.

Feature 3

 

 

 

 

 

This installation began with a desire to be able to approach a celestial body. As I was already investigating Mars, I wondered if meticulously rendering its surface would enlighten me about my own. At seven and a half feet tall and wide, it just begins to loom over human height, recalling the dimensions of the sphere encircling the Vitruvian Man.

As I drew, I began relating to the planet as one body to another. Its jagged Mariner Valley became the scabbed scar across my leg; its craters began to resemble birth marks. It was my hope that my audience would begin to recognize themselves in this astronomical entity, as I did while I was drawing it.
 

Marina-Fridman-drawing-installation
Marina-Fridman-largescale-drawing


details of mars


Entirely hand-drawn using charcoal pencils and compressed charcoal sticks on white paper, these trompe-l’oeil style drawings appear convincingly three-dimensional from afar. Upon close examination, however, one perceives the thousands of pencil marks that make up the images.

As the viewers' eyes adjust to the dim lighting, even from the seemingly smooth, empty space enveloping the planets emerge the gestural marks that make up the texture of the drawn void. The hand becomes evident in its making, revealing a record of movements and actions of the body, and allowing the viewer to imagine their own hand taking part in its creation.

What was previously perceived to be stillness becomes animated. Absence becomes presence. The void becomes full, transformed from an empty non-space into a productive, primordial scene of emergence, as though preceding the beginnings of the universe.
 

Marina-Fridman-Mars-drawing-detail
Marina-Fridman-drawing-detail
 Details of Mariner Valley, the vast canyon system that bisects Mars. Charcoal pencils on white paper.

Details of Mariner Valley, the vast canyon system that bisects Mars. Charcoal pencils on white paper.


Overview

Drawing installation, 14' wide x 7'8" tall, 2018.
Hand-drawn using charcoal pencils and compressed charcoal sticks on white paper.
 

My research in the astronomical led to a phenomenon called the Overview Effect, which is a term used to describe the profound awe and deep cognitive shift experienced by astronauts viewing Earth from space. The phenomenon has been described by astronauts as a profound sense of bliss and timelessness, a difference-dissolving unity, and an interconnected euphoria. Further research revealed that the Overview Effect is said to be a state similar to that achieved by meditating Buddhist monks. Not only is it the goal of my work to create such an experience, but I myself have had similar epiphanies during yoga and meditation. Many of these profound experiences have driven my artistic practice over the years. Wishing to create even a glimpse of the Overview Effect for my audience, I drew the Earth and Moon for us to view as though from space. These drawings also became a part of my immersive drawing installation, Omniscient Body.

 Earth (bottom left) and the Moon (top right). Charcoal on white paper.

Earth (bottom left) and the Moon (top right). Charcoal on white paper.

Earth-drawing-Marina-Fridman
 Details of Earth (top) and the Moon (bottom). Charcoal pencils on white paper.

Details of Earth (top) and the Moon (bottom). Charcoal pencils on white paper.